Skip directly to content

Sexual Health

Did you know?

The majority of people who contract the two most common STIs – chlamydia and gonorrhea – do not exhibit any symptoms. And yet both of these infections can lead to serious illness

Sex now…STIs later?

Most young people have sex for the first time at about age 17, but they do not marry until their middle or late 20s. This means that young adults are at risk of unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) for nearly a decade

Did you know?

Birth control pills, including Alesse, do not protect you from getting STIs, including HIV/AIDS. Keep reading to see how you can protect yourself from STIs

Pssst….looking for more info on birth control and sexuality? Go to the Sexuality and U website: www.sexualityandu.ca

Your Sexual Health

Sex should be exciting and amazing – but it should also be safe! That's why before you and your partner get started on your sexual journey together, you should talk about how to keep things healthy.

STIs

With great power comes great responsibility…and with unsafe sex comes…STIs?

You're young and healthy – and sexually active. And when you hear the words "Sexually transmitted infections" is your reaction "Ewww"? or "Nope…not me"?

Take note: no matter how you feel, STIs don’t care.
They can infect and affect just about anyone! STIs don’t discriminate. And worse, STIs can do a lot of harm. That’s why it is essential you take care to protect yourself from STIs by:

  • Practising safer sex by using male and/or female condoms
  • Having an open line of communication with your sexual partner and knowing if his/her behaviour puts you at risk
  • Talking to your doctor about your concerns
  • Knowing the signs and symptoms of STIs and getting treated immediately

The Pill and a condom? Why not!

Dual methods (most often the condom combined with another method) are used by 13.5% of contraceptive users. The proportions using more than one method are greatest among teenagers and never-married women.

Yes, you’re on Alesse.
But don’t forget the Male Condom!

The condom for men is a sheath usually made from thin latex. It fits over the erect penis to prevent sperm from entering the vagina during intercourse. It should be rolled down over the erect penis before any genital contact between the partners.

Before the penis becomes soft, the penis and the condom must be withdrawn from the vagina. This is done by carefully holding the rim of the condom to prevent the semen from spilling. The condom is the best preventative measure to reduce the risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

It is recommended that a spermicidal foam or cream also be used for additional protection. Using a condom, along with another form of contraception such as "the Pill," is an excellent method of birth control and disease prevention.

And for women…
who knew latex was in style for you?

The condom for women is a large sheath with a ring at one end to position it in the vagina. There is another larger ring, which remains outside to protect the vulva. This design covers more genitals than the male condom, providing more protection from STIs.